Celebrated Activist Dr. John Carlos Visits HNU

johncarlosCelebrated civil rights activist and Olympic-athlete Dr. John Carlos visited HNU the week of November 11. He is the coauthor of The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment that Changed the World, which students and faculty selected for the 2013 HNU Common Reading Book. In addition to chronicling historic sports and social justice events of the 1960s, this story shares Carlos’ experience with dyslexia, coming of age as a young black man, and the civil rights movement.

Carlos was born in Harlem, New York, in 1945. Carlos says that he was influenced by the poverty, racism, and lack of opportunity that he observed in his childhood. One of his first dreams was to swim in the Olympics, but his focus shifted to track and field after his father talked to him about the hurdles he would face due to racism.

Carlos’ father explained to him that he would not be able to swim at the Olympics because he did not have a place to train. The Harlem River was too dangerous, the public pool was too crowded, and the ocean was too rough. His father also said that he could not join a club, but not because of the cost. “He took his hand out and rubbed on his hand—I thought he had a bug bite. But he was expressing to me that merely because of the color of my skin, I would not be able to represent America,” Carlos said at a presentation to HNU students on November 14.

After graduating from Machine Trade and Medal High School, Carlos went to East Texas State University (ETSU) on a full track and field scholarship. He attended ETSU for one year, winning the Lone Star Conference Championship. After ETSU, he enrolled at San José State University. While a student at San José State University, he participated in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico and won the bronze medal in the 200 meters. During the victory ceremony, Carlos and fellow U.S. medalist Tommie Smith raised a black-gloved fist in protest against racism and economic depression for all opposed peoples.

“Why did I fight back? I didn’t fight for me. I fought for you, I fought for your kids, I fought for my kids, my kids’ kids,” Carlos said. “I went to Mexico City, and I didn’t put my fist in the sky for John Carlos. I put it up for my kids, my kids’ kids, and you all right now today—to have the opportunity to exchange one another’s ideas and thoughts about how we can make this a better society.”

Following the 1968 Summer Olympics, Carlos continued his education and athletic feats at San José State University where he broke the world record in the 100-yard dash and helped win the National Collegiate Athletic Association Track & Field National Championship in 1969. Concluding an illustrious career in track and field, Carlos was drafted by the National Football League (NFL). He entered the public sector after a short career in the NFL, working for PUMA, the Olympics, and the City of Los Angeles.

The week of HNU activities included the presentation of two documentaries on the 1968 Summer Olympics, the Black Student Union event Celebrating Our Legacy of Rhythm, and a public forum featuring Carlos on November 14.

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Daniel Ransom Selected to Participate in ALA Emerging Leaders Program

Daniel Ransom, an instructional librarian at the Paul J. Cushing Library, Holy Names University, is among 56 people selected to participate in the American Library Association’s (ALA) 2014 Emerging Leaders program. The program enables library staff and information workers to participate in project planning workgroups, network with peers, and get an inside look into ALA structure. The program features a day-long kickoff session at the ALA’s Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia, and continues with a six-month online learning and networking environment. The culmination of the program is a poster session at the 2014 Annual Conference in Las Vegas at which participants showcase the results of their project-planning work.

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Holy Names University Welcomes John Carlos, Author of: The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment that Changed the World

WHAT:
HNU students and faculty selected The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment that Changed the World authored by John Carlos and Dave Zirin, for the 2013 Common Reading. In addition to chronicling historic sports and social justice events of the 1960s, this story shares Carlos’ experience with dyslexia, coming of age as a young black man, and the American Civil Rights movement. Dr. Carlos connects his experience with national and global social justice movements and contemporary issues.

WHO:
Dr. John Carlos, an author, decorated-athlete, and celebrated Civil Rights activist, will be visiting Holy Names University. Carlos was born in Harlem, New York, in 1945. After graduating from Machine Trade and Medal High School, he was awarded a full track and field scholarship to East Texas State University (ETSU). He attended ETSU for one year, single-handedly winning the school’s first and only track and field Lone Star Conference Championship. After ETSU, he matriculated to San José State University.

During his stay at San José State University, he participated in the 1968 Mexico Olympics and won the bronze medal in the 200 meters. During the victory ceremony, John and Tommy Smith raised a black gloved fist in protest against racism and economic depression for all opposed peoples. This “Silent Protest” was voted as the sixth most memorable event of the century.

Following the Mexico Olympics, Carlos continued his education and athletic feats at San José State University where he single handedly won the NCAA Track & Field National Championship in 1969. During his stay, he broke the world record in the hundred-yard dash. Concluding an illustrious career in track and field, Carlos was drafted by the NFL. After a short career in the NFL, he entered the public sector, working for PUMA, the Olympics, and the City of Los Angeles.

WHEN:
Thursday, November 14
6:00 p.m. – reception; 6:30 p.m. – presentation
Both events are free and open to the public

WHERE:
Holy Names University
3500 Mountain Boulevard, Oakland, CA
Valley Center for the Performing Arts – Regents’ Theatre

Free parking

WHY:
Continuing his life-long mission to improve human rights conditions and to increase the chances of success for today’s youth, Dr. Carlos is actively involved with global and community movements. In April of 2008, he again took to the international stage. He was a bearer for the Human Rights Torch, which ran parallel to the 2008 Summer Olympics torch relay and focused attention on China’s human rights record. In July of the same year, Dr. Carlos accepted the Arthur Ashe Award for Courage for his salute at the 2008 Espy Awards.

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Grant Allows Library to Expand Information Literacy Services

IMLS_Logo_2cThe Paul J. Cushing Library is one of only 14 institutions nationwide to receive a 2013 Sparks! Ignition Grant for Libraries and Museums.

The grant, which was awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) in the amount of $23,660, supports the development of multimedia recordings providing information literacy instruction on topics such as citation management and research. IMLS is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Through grant making, policy development, and research, IMLS helps communities and individuals thrive through broad public access to knowledge, cultural heritage, and lifelong learning.

Information literacy instruction at HNU has typically been limited to one or two hour lectures led by librarians that are incorporated into regular class sessions on an annual basis. The grant allows the library to extend the reach of face-to-face instruction through digital learning recordings that are created with lecture-capture software. The recordings, which are being developed with input from HNU Athletics and the Department of Nursing, will provide instruction to a broader group of students and be available online. This will benefit athletes and adult students who are not on campus as regularly. An additional advantage is that students will be able to watch the recordings as many times as needed to learn complex concepts.

“This is the first time face-to-face active learning and digital learning objects have been intentionally and programmatically aligned in an academic library setting,” University Librarian Karen Schneider and Librarian for Research and Digitization Nicole Branch wrote in the grant proposal. “This proposal tests a method of expanding and amplifying the reach of information literacy instruction, a core service in academic librarianship.”

Learning informational literacy competencies is of particular importance to HNU’s student population, who may not have received previous guidance on these topics. A significant number of undergraduate students are the first in their families to attend college, and 92 percent of students are from California, where elementary and secondary school libraries are not mandated.

Schneider and Branch say that the sometimes mundane but important skills covered in these recordings will help students learn critical skills that they need to be successful—leaving more classroom time for interactive dialogue.

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Holy Names University Receives Grant from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to Update Folk Song Website

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has granted Holy Names University $75,000. These funds will be used to update the American Folk Song Collection website developed by the University’s Kodály Center for Music Education. The website was originally created with the support of a previous foundation grant, and is the only site with recordings of traditional folk songs and their transcriptions.

“The American Folk Song Collection is a very rare website that has remained important to its constituency despite having a user interface that has not been updated since the site’s creation 10 years ago. We are planning on bringing critical updates to the site in both its technical structure and in its content,” said Anne Laskey, director of the Kodály Center for Music Education. The center teaches its students pedagogical strategies inspired by Hungarian composer and educator Zoltan Kodály (1882–1967), who catalogued folk songs and emphasized the importance of music in the intellectual, emotional, physical, and social development of children.

The grant will be utilized to make a modern, newly designed website that allows users to access various forms of content using a wide range of platforms, including desktop computers, tablets, and phones.

The song database will also double in size from 350 songs to more than 700 songs. Songs that are underrepresented on the site will be added, broadening the site’s coverage of geographical regions, ethnic groups, and song types—for example, sea chanteys, spirituals, and ballads. New material will include Spanish songs and songs from the Library of Congress.

In addition, a new music curriculum is being developed for grades one to three that will provide learning objectives, songs for each lesson, and references and links to the site. “This will be a major enhancement to the educational value of the site,” Laskey said.

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been making grants since 1967 to help solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. The foundation concentrates its resources on activities in education, the environment, global development and population, performing arts, and philanthropy, and makes grants to support disadvantaged communities in the San Francisco Bay Area.

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